Life Aboard

March 7, 2009 § Leave a comment

Nelson’s Flagships 1807 Nicholas Pocock

“What I hope to bring together here is a comprehensive source for the era: weapons and armaments, personages, single ship and minor fleet actions, and way of life aboard a man o’war during the Age of Sail.”
I’m so thrilled that the author of Age of Sail and his fascinating website has become known to me.  He accomplishes just what his mission statement intends, and more besides, comprehending reviews also of  Georgian period maritime novels, such as the superb Horatio Hornblower books by C.S. Forester.
I’m indebted to Age of Sail, I have always wished to know more about maritime life in the Georgian era, not least because the narratives of Persuasion and Mansfield Park are not only populated with characters in the navy, the plots are even driven at times by the movement of these maritime characters. Also, because two of Jane Austen’s brothers were sailors, and one rose to become an admiral, but really because the trade conducted, the travel accomplished, the exploratory research conducted and battles fought at sea had a phenomenal effect on Georgian Britain. Do visit.
“…by G–, you lost a fine sight by not being here in the morning to see the Thrush go out of harbour! I would not have been out of the way for a thousand pounds. Old Scholey ran in at breakfast-time, to say she had slipped her moorings and was coming out, I jumped up, and made but two steps to the platform. If ever there was a perfect beauty afloat, she is one; and there she lays at Spithead, and anybody in England would take her for an eight-and-twenty. I was upon the platform two hours this afternoon looking at her.”
– Mansfield Park, chapter 38
“…I do assure you, ma’am,” pursued Mrs Croft, “that nothing can exceed the accommodations of a man-of-war; I speak, you know, of the higher rates. When you come to a frigate, of course, you are more confined; though any reasonable woman may be perfectly happy in one of them; and I can safely say, that the happiest part of my life has been spent on board a ship.”
– Persuasion, chapter 8
Related topics on Grey Pony: Armed Neutrality: Horatio Nelson, Peaches and Cream: Lady Hamilton

“What I hope to bring together here is a comprehensive source for the era: weapons and armaments, personages, single ship and minor fleet actions, and way of life aboard a man o’war during the Age of Sail.”

I’m so thrilled that the author of Age of Sail and his fascinating website has become known to me.  He accomplishes just what his mission statement intends, and more besides, comprehending reviews also of  Georgian period maritime novels, such as the superb Horatio Hornblower books by C.S. Forester. I’m indebted to Age of Sail, I have always wished to know more about maritime life in the Georgian era, not least because the narratives of Persuasion and Mansfield Park are not only populated with characters in the navy, the plots are even driven at times by the movement of these maritime characters. Also, because two of Jane Austen’s brothers were sailors, and one rose to become an admiral, but really because the trade conducted, the travel accomplished, the exploratory research conducted and battles fought at sea had a phenomenal effect on Georgian Britain. Do visit.

“…by G–, you lost a fine sight by not being here in the morning to see the Thrush go out of harbour! I would not have been out of the way for a thousand pounds. Old Scholey ran in at breakfast-time, to say she had slipped her moorings and was coming out, I jumped up, and made but two steps to the platform. If ever there was a perfect beauty afloat, she is one; and there she lays at Spithead, and anybody in England would take her for an eight-and-twenty. I was upon the platform two hours this afternoon looking at her.” – Mansfield Park, chapter 38

“…I do assure you, ma’am,” pursued Mrs Croft, “that nothing can exceed the accommodations of a man-of-war; I speak, you know, of the higher rates. When you come to a frigate, of course, you are more confined; though any reasonable woman may be perfectly happy in one of them; and I can safely say, that the happiest part of my life has been spent on board a ship.”- Persuasion, chapter 8

Related topics on Grey Pony: Armed Neutrality: Horatio Nelson, Peaches and Cream: Lady Hamilton

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